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 Home < Academics < Undergraduate < Division IV < Sociology

Major

Minor

Courses

Programs offered:

B.A. in Sociology
B.A. in Sociology with Concentration in Social Work
Minor in Sociology (TU)

Sociology is the study of human society, culture, and conduct from a variety of perspectives that include interpersonal, institutional, and aggregate levels of analyses. At the interpersonal level, sociologists may study personality formation in social contexts or how the individual responds to social opportunities and constraints. At the institutional level, sociologists attempt to analyze social institutions (such as the family, religion, and the state) and social structures (such as social classes and racial and ethnic stratification) that shape human conduct. And at the aggregate level, sociology focuses on the study of large-scale influences ranging from demographics to social movements to cultural systems.

The mission of the sociology faculty at Oglethorpe is to introduce students to such studies within a liberal arts setting by developing each studentís analytical, writing, speaking, and methodological skills, as well as his or her ability to comprehend and explicate difficult texts. Sociology majors should be able, through written and oral analyses, to make arguments whose conclusions follow from evidence carefully and logically presented. They should be able to distinguish between informed and uninformed opinion. In addition, each sociology student at Oglethorpe will be expected to master essential knowledge within the areas of sociological theory, research methodology, and statistics, and within at least three content areas. In order to encourage a practical understanding of social problems and institutions, students, where appropriate, are urged to seek internships. Students bound for graduate school are encouraged to master a foreign language.


B. A. in Sociology

1. Completion of all of the following courses:
MAT 111 Statistics
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 310 Survey of Research Methods
SOC 403 Sociological Theory

2. Completion of five additional Sociology electives.

3. Additional requirements and things to note:
a. At least six of the nine required courses must be taken at Oglethorpe.
b. COR 201 Human Nature and the Social Order I and COR 202 Human Nature and the Social Order II must be completed by all Sociology majors who enter Oglethorpe with less than junior status.
c. No course taken in completion of the major can be used towards any other major or minor.


B.A. in Sociology with Concentration in Social Work

1. Completion of all of the following courses:
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 303 Field of Social Work
SOC 304 Methods of Social Work

2. Completion of four additional Sociology electives.

3. Completion of SOC 402 Field Experience in Social Work (12-16 hours).

4. Additional requirements and things to note:
a. No course taken in completion of the major can be used towards any other major or minor.

Minor in Sociology (TU)

1. Completion of SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.
2. Completion of three Sociology electives (totaling at least 12 semester hours).
3. Additional requirements and things to note:
a. At least three of the four required courses must be taken at Oglethorpe..

The following courses are offered in Sociology:


SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology 4 hours
This course offers an introduction to topics central to the study of human society, culture, and conduct. Selected fields of study frequently include culture, formation of the self, social classes, power structures, social movements, criminal behavior, and a variety of social institutions. Emphasis is placed upon basic concepts and principal findings of the field. Offered annually.

SOC 201. The Family 4 hours
This course focuses primarily on the 20th-century American family. The topics discussed include trends in marriage, the age of marriage, fertility, illegitimacy, divorce, remarriage, and domestic abuse. The possible social and economic causes and consequences of these trends are also discussed. Offered annually.
 
SOC 202. The American Experience 4 hours
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with basic aspects of the American experience. Special attention is paid to the individualís relationship to the community. Specific topics of discussion include Populism, Federalism, the role of advertising in folk culture, the relationship of technology and democracy, and Americaís exploring spirit. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 204. Social Problems 4 hours
This course studies the impact of current social forces upon American society. Deviation from social norms, conflict concerning social goals and values, and social disorganization as these apply to family, economic, religious, and other institutional and interpersonal situations are of primary concern. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 205. Crime and Deviance 4 hours
This course will examine behaviors that do not conform to moral and legal codes and the ways in which societies control such behaviors. Particular emphasis will be given to American society. Readings will include classic and current analyses of deviance and crime. Offered biennially.

 
SOC 302. The Sociology of Work and Occupations 4 hours
This course has three purposes: first, to analyze the means by which non-economic institutions, especially the family, schools, and religious institutions influence the formation of "human capital," second, to study the history and contemporary nature of the professions; and third, to analyze the relationship between the external control of workers and their internal motivation. A cross-cultural approach is employed in the course. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 303. Field of Social Work 4 hours
This course will study and analyze the historical development of social work and social work activities in contemporary society. Offered biennially.
 
ULP 303. The New American City 4 hours
The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and policymaking in the new American city and its environs. Consideration will be given to the political and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new development, including the extremes of wealth and poverty, the mix of racial and ethnic groups, and the opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and technology. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 304. Methods of Social Work 4 hours
This course is a study of the methods used in contemporary social work. Offered biennially. Prerequisite: SOC 303.
 
SOC 305. Film and Society 4 hours
This course is designed to help students analyze and interpret films from the perspectives of social theory. Emphasis will be placed upon exploring visions of the self and society in a variety of film genres, including mysteries, comedies, film noir, westerns, musicals, etc. Films studied in recent classes include Citizen Kane, Vertigo, The Maltese Falcon, Red River, Cabaret, and others. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 306. Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration 4 hours
This course treats contemporary ethnic relations and the history of immigration in the United States. It considers the role of markets, government policy, and culture in the formation of ethnic identity and the well being of ethnic groups. Although the chief concern is with the United States, a comparative approach is taken. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 307. Elites and Inequality 4 hours
An examination is made in this course of the social stratification of privileges and deprivations in contemporary societies, focusing on the distribution of wealth, status, and power. The course studies social stratification historically and comparatively, the American upper, middle, and lower classes, institutionalized power elites, race and gender stratification, status systems, and economic inequality. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 308. Culture and Society 4 hours
A study of the dynamics of traditional, modern, and postmodern cultures that focuses on the analysis of symbolic forms and boundaries, social memory, ceremonies and rituals, bodily habits, cultural elites, and cultural revolutions. Special attention is given to "culture wars," the impact of mass media, and postmodernism in contemporary societies. The course is comparative in approach. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 309. Religion and Society 4 hours
This course will examine religion as a social institution, its internal development, relationship to other institutions, and its cultural and social significance in modern and traditional societies. Special attention will be given to the conflict between spirit and institution in Christianity; the rise and decline of denominationalism; contemporary forms of spirituality; the modern psychologization of religion, and the comparative study of religions. Offered biennially.

 
SOC 401. Nations and Nationalism 4 hours
This course examines the rise and persistence of nation-states and nationalism in the modern world. Theories of nationalism, nationalist visions, and case studies of particular nations, including France, Germany, and Russia will be covered. Topics to be addressed include radical nationalism (for example, Nazism and Fascism), problems of national "self-determination," Zionism, and the fall of Communism.
 
SOC 402. Field Experience in Social Work 16 hours
Students concentrating in social work spend a semester in social work agencies in the Atlanta area for on-the-job practicum experience. Successful field placements have been made in a variety of settings in recent years, including Wesley Woods Health Center, West Paces Ferry Hospital, and Atlanta shelters for the homeless. Prerequisites: SOC 303, permission of the academic advisor and faculty supervisor, and signature of the Director of Career Services.
 
SOC 403. Sociological Theory 4 hours
This course will study classical and contemporary theory with an emphasis upon the latter. Contemporary theories covered usually include utilitarian individualism (sociobiology, exchange theory, and rational-choice theory), communitarianism, civil society theory, critical theory, and post-modernism. Offered biennially.
 
SOC 404. Special Topics in Sociology 4 hours
A seminar providing examination and discussion of various topics on contemporary and historical interest in sociology. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
 
SOC 405. Internship in Sociology 1-4 hours
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the Gainesville/Hall Senior Center, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, and the Partnership Against Domestic Violence. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program.
 
SOC 406. Independent Study in Sociology 1-4 hours
An intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration.
 
SOC 407. Internship in American Studies 1-4 hours
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by the Career Services Office. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program.
 

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