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 Home < Academics < Undergraduate < Division VII < English

 

 

Programs offered:

B.A. in English and Comparative Literature
Minor in English and Comparative Literature (TU)
Minor in English (EDP)

Minor in Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies (TU)

In literature courses, students examine written works to determine their meanings, to reach judgments about their value, to explore their relation to life and to their historical contexts, and to derive pleasure. To these ends, students make both written and oral analyses, supporting their conclusions with close examination of specific textual passages from the works of literature being studied. In both literature and writing courses, students learn to compose their interpretations and supporting details into a coherent and convincing structure of thought and language. Students in literary writing classes learn about poetry, fiction and nonfiction by working to develop the insight, imagination, and discipline required to create them and by studying instructive examples of these genres.

A major in English and Comparative Literature is excellent preparation for law school or any other professional training that requires students to interpret written material and support their assertions with specific evidence. Given the expressed need in the business community for people who can communicate well orally and on paper, the combination of an English and Comparative Literature major and courses in Business Administration or an Accounting minor may be very attractive to prospective employers. The course CRS 260 Writing for Business and the Professions focuses on the kinds of speaking and writing abilities graduates will need to get jobs in personnel, sales and management. Oglethorpe graduates also work in public relations and editing, where they use their skill with words—a major emphasis of every English course. They go into teaching and sometimes work for publishers, television stations, film-making companies or computer firms. They write press releases, training manuals, in-house newspapers and news copy.

To help students bridge the gap between academic life and work experience, Oglethorpe places English and Comparative Literature majors in internships with area newspapers, publishing companies, public relations firms, cultural associations and radio and television stations. Such experiences enhance students’ chances of finding the jobs they want after graduation.

B. A. in English and Comparative Literature

1. Completion of all of the following courses:
ENG 101 Ancient Literature
ENG 102 Medieval and Renaissance Literature
ENG 103 18th and 19th Century Literature
ENG 104 Modern and Contemporary Literature

2. Completion of one of the following courses:
ENG 201 Chaucer
ENG 204 Shakespeare: Early Plays, To 1603
ENG 206 Shakespeare: Late Plays, 1603 – 1613

3. Completion of one Writing course.

4. Completion of four English and Comparative Literature courses, each at the 200- or 300-level.

5. Additional requirements and things to note:
a. The following courses, taught by foreign language faculty in translation (with English texts), are pre-approved for cross-listed 200-, 300- and 400-level credit in the major and the minor in English and Comparative Literature:

JPN 250 Princes, Hermits and Courtesans: Traditional Japanese Literature in Translation
JPN 251 Identity and Nation in Modern Japanese Literature
FRE 406, SPN 406 French and Spanish Crossroads in the Caribbean and Africa

Minor in English and Comparative Literature (TU)

1. Completion of a minimum of five English and Comparative Literature courses, at least three of which must be at the 300-level.

Minor in English (EDP)

The requirements are identical to those for the Minor in English and Comparative Literature (TU) (see above).

Minor in Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies (TU)

The Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies minor is intended to provide students with not only an in-depth understanding of the works of William Shakespeare but also some familiarity with the time and culture in which he lived. Students are also strongly encouraged to pursue a range of approaches, including literary, historical, and cultural study, as well as performance.

1. Completion of two of the following Shakespeare courses:
ENG 204 Shakespeare: Early Plays to 1603
ENG 206 Shakespeare: Late Plays, 1603-1613
ENG 393 Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Shakespeare at Oxford*
THE 305 Shakespearean Performance

2. Completion of one of the following courses with a historical component:
ART 300 Italian Renaissance Art History
ART 310 Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art History
HIS 211 The Renaissance and Reformation
HIS 212 Early Modern Europe
HIS 490 Advanced Special Topics in History: The Age of Elizabeth

3. Completion of one of the following Renaissance art, literature, politics, science, or culture courses:
ART 300 Italian Renaissance Art History
ART 310 Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art History
ENG 390 Special Topics in Drama (e.g.: Shakespeare’s Contemporaries, Medieval and
Tudor Drama, Renaissance Poetry)
GEN 101 Natural Sciences – The Physical Sciences: Renaissance Science
HIS 415 The Witch Craze
POL 441 Seminar in Political Philosophy: Shakespeare and Politics

4. Additional requirements and things to note:
a. No single course may fulfill the requirement for more than one category.
b. In the category 1., above, it is strongly recommended that the student pursue one option focused in literary study and the other in performance.
c. * An occasional summer course.

The following courses are offered in English:


ENG 100. Independent Study in Literature and Composition 1-4 hours
Supervised study in specified genres or periods. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration.
 
ENG 101. Ancient Literature 4 hours
This course will examine the literature of the ancient world. Although the primary focus will be on Greek, Roman, and Hebrew culture, non-Western materials may also be studied. Works and authors might include: Gilgamesh, Homer, Job, and Virgil.
 
ENG 102. Medieval and Renaissance Literature 4 hours
This course will examine the transition of the cultural world of Dante to that of Shakespeare and Milton. Although the primary focus will be Western, non-Western works may also be studied. Texts and authors might include: Chretien, Dante, The Tale of Genji, Chaucer, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Cervantes, and Milton.
 
ENG 103. 18th and 19th Century Literature 4 hours
Authors in this course might include: Defoe, Pope, Basho, Austen, Emerson, Twain, and George Eliot.
 
ENG 104. Modern and Contemporary Literature 4 hours
This course will investigate the literature of the 20th century. Authors might include: T. S. Eliot, Woolf, Lawrence, Frost, Morrison, and Marquez.

ENG 201. Chaucer 4 hours
Students will learn to read and appreciate the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, the first great English poet, in his original language; to enjoy the rich and varied nature of his works; and to appreciate why he is called "the Father of English." Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 202. Shakespeare 4 hours
The plays and theatre of William Shakespeare. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG. 230. Creative Writing 4 hours
This course is an introduction to writing poetry and prose fiction. The student will be asked to submit substantial written work each week, keep a journal, and read published writers. Much class time will be spent discussing student and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.
 
ENG 231. Biography and Autobiography 4 hours
This course is an introduction to biographical and autobiographical writing with practice in the personal narrative as well as other forms such as the profile and the interview. Students will submit substantial written work each week and keep a journal. The class will follow a workshop format, discussing the students' and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.
 
ENG 300. The Bible as Literature 4 hours
This course will examine the Bible as a literary artifact and within an historical context. Students will be particularly interested in the varied ways in which the Bible generates meaning. These include archetypal repetition, the weaving together of historically disparate texts, parable, and allegory. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 301. Russian Literature 4 hours
This course will consist of Russian literature in translation, mostly fiction, mostly from the 19th century. Central to the course is Anna Karenina. In addition to Tolstoy, authors might include: Gogol, Dostoevski, and Chekhov. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 302. The Child in Literature 4 hours
This course will involve a wide-ranging study of works which employ innocence, particularly in childhood, in order to deepen the understanding of experience. Authors might include: Sophocles, Blake, Carroll, James, and Kafka. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 303. American Poetry 4 hours
This course will consider the work of major American poets such as Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, Eliot, and Williams. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 304. Images of Women in Literature 4 hours
An exploration of various stereotypical, archetypal, and realistic images of women in literature. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
WGS 304. Women Poets 4 hours
This course is a survey of poetry by women, from ancient Chinese, Persian, and others in translation, to medieval Irish and Renaissance English, to 19th and 20th century Americans, as well as Eastern Europeans and Latin Americans in translation. Included will be several recent poets such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich, and Mary Oliver in order to discover what themes, images, and attitudes seem to emerge from the works. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.
 
ENG 305. Chivalric Romance 4 hours
This course will explore the chivalric tales of "knights and ladies' gentle deeds," paying particular attention to models of heroism and temptation; tensions between holy and secular quests; dichotomies of masculine and feminine identity; and canons of moral and ethical behavior. Authors might include Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Arisoto, and Spenser. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 306. Special Topics in Drama 4 hours
Drama as literature and genre, through survey and period studies. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 307. Milton 4 hours
This course will examine the major prose and poetry of John Milton and their place in 17th century English culture. Works studied will include Areopagitica, Lycidas, Samson Agonistes, and Paradise Lost. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 308. Special Topics in Poetry 4 hours
This course will focus on particular poets, movements, styles, or periods. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 309. Literature of the City and the Country 4 hours
This course will concentrate on 19th and 20th century English and American literature in order to deepen the student's understanding and test the conceptions of the natural and the urban. Authors might include Wordsworth, Dickens, Thoreau, Woolf, and Frost. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 310. Special Topics in Fiction 4 hours
English, American, and continental narrative prose will be examined in the context of theme, period, or genre. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 311. Ulysses 4 hours
This course will focus on a thorough reading of Ulysses but might also examine other works by James Joyce, such as Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and selections from Finnegans Wake. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 312. Special Topics in Literature and Culture 4 hours
Courses relating literature with aspects of social and intellectual history or a particular issue or theme. Possible offerings may include women in literature, American civilization, African-American (or other ethnic) literature, popular culture, the literature of a single decade, children's literature, and myth and folklore in literature. Usually offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 313. African-American Literary Traditions 4 hours
This course surveys African-American literature and literary history. It begins with a close examination of the slave narrative and the African-American sentimental novel of the 19th century. An exploration is made of the literature of the Harlem Renaissance, followed by works like Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man and Richard Wright's Native Son. Finally, civil rights era literature and works by authors such as Gloria Naylor and Alice Walker will be examined. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course, preferably Modern and Contemporary Literature.
 
ENG 314. Special Topics in Major British and American Authors 4 hours
An intensive study of between one and five British or American authors. Prerequisite: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 315. Vision, Violence, and Community in Milton, Blake, Whitman, and Yeats 4 hours
This course will examine works by four major visionary poets. In the historical context of English civil war, the French Revolution, the American Civil War, and World War I and the Irish rebellions, they tried to envision for their cultures a restoration of community between the temporal and the eternal, the human and the divine. In times of fragmentation and crisis, each re-invented a traditional mythology. A study will be made of their individual visions to those collective myths and to personal struggles. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course.
 
ENG 330. Writing Poetry 4 hours
In weekly assignments students will try free verse and various forms in the effort to discover and to embody more and more truly what they have to say. Much time will be spent reading published poets, responding to student work in class, and trying to generate language that reveals rather than explains intangible "meanings." Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.
 
ENG 331. Writing Prose, Fiction, and Nonfiction 4 hours
Students will get instruction and substantial practice in writing fictional and nonfictional prose which aims at getting what Henry James called "a sense of felt life" onto the page. The class will follow a workshop format with weekly assignments, journal writing, extensive discussion of student work, and reading of published examples. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.
 
ENG 401. Internship in English 1-4 hours
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at Atlanta Magazine, The Knight Agency, and Peachtree Publishers. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program.
 
 

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